The first hand drill I restored was a Craftsman 107.1 (sometimes called a 1071, since folks can’t make out the period).  This drill is a clone of the Millers Falls no. 2A hand drill.  Clones like this were manufactured by one maker for another brand, in this case, Millers Falls company made these to be sold under the Craftsman name.  I felt a little trepidation before my first drill restoration, but I was mollified somewhat by the atrocious paint on this drill.  I felt it would be difficult to screw it up much more.

Regarding the paint, for a moment – I’m not sure what the story is with it.  Was it an original paint job done for Craftsman?  A way for MF to disguise their drill?  (This might make sense, as the finish underneath the paint is standard MF red stain.)  Or did some previous owner think it would look better in milk-white?  I suspect it is original to the drill.

Craftsman 107.1 hand drill, as acquired.

Craftsman 107.1 hand drill, as acquired.

 

Craftsman 107.1 hand drill, as acquired.

Craftsman 107.1 hand drill, as acquired.

 

The side knob is present, which is lucky. Many of these go missing, since they're removable and some people don't like them.

The lower gear (L) is held in place with a pin that goes through the spindle, capturing both parts within the frame.  The upper gear (R) is captured on a shaft that goes up into the handle, where it is pinned in place through a threaded rod integral to the frame.

 

The crank handle turned freely.

The crank handle turned freely.  I don’t know if the hex headed bolt is original or not.

 

Ugly paint, not withstanding.

Crank knob with atrocious paint.  Probably lead-based, to boot – at least that’s what I assumed.  Dust masks, good ventilation,  and a good wash up after sanding were my precautions.

 

Someone was sloppy with the paint. They got some on the rivet.

Someone was sloppy with the paint. They got some on the rivet.

 

It's easy to see why many of these are advertised as no. 1071 instead of 107.1

Crank arm.  It’s easy to see why many of these are advertised as no. 1071 instead of 107.1

 

The handle was not cracked.

The handle was not cracked.

 

Why, what is that pleasing rattle coming from inside the handle?

Why, what is that pleasing rattle coming from inside the handle?

 

A very nice extra was the set of original drills (or 'contemporary' would probably be more accurate).

A very nice extra was the set of original drills (or ‘contemporary’ would probably be more accurate).

A pin holds the handle/ferrule to the frame.

A pin holds the handle/ferrule to the frame.

 

This chuck will accommodate bits from 0 to 3/8". In my experience, 3/8" is pushing it for a hand drill.

This chuck will accommodate bits from 0 to 3/8″. In my experience, 3/8″ is pushing it for a hand drill.

 

Three jaw chuck opened and closed freely.

The three jaw chuck opened and closed freely and was flush when closed.

 

The side knob is present, which is lucky. Many of these go missing, since they're removable and some people don't like them.

The side knob is present, which is lucky. Many of these go missing, since they’re removable and some people don’t like them.

 

The ferrule is nickel plated.

The ferrule is nickel plated.

 

Boy, what were they thinking with that paint?

Boy, what were they thinking with that paint?

 

Frame, with the side knob removed. This isn't all that dirty, just 70+ years of light rust.

Frame, with the side knob removed. This isn’t all that dirty, just 70+ years of light rust.

 

The wheel was a little rusty, but the paint wasn't all that bad, actually.

The wheel was a little rusty, but the paint wasn’t all that bad, actually.

 

Notice the standard Millers Falls spoke arrangement. The wavy spokes help accommodate internal stresses in the metal after the casting cools; they serve a purpose beyond just show.

Notice the standard Millers Falls spoke arrangement. The wavy spokes help accommodate internal stresses in the metal after the casting cools; they serve a purpose beyond just show.

Now, on to the restoration:

The wheel was cleaned up on a wire wheel on my bench grinder, and the spokes were sanded clean of paint. It's easier to sand blast the spokes clean, but I didn't have a blaster at this point.

The wheel was cleaned up on a wire wheel on my bench grinder, and the spokes were sanded clean of paint. It’s easier to sand blast the spokes clean, but I didn’t have a blaster at this point.

The hub, rim, and gear teeth were masked before painting.

The hub, rim, and gear teeth were masked before painting.

Cleaned up nicely.

Cleaned up nicely.

 

The side knob was chucked into a drill with tape to protect the threads. I sanded the knob and the ferrule (the nickel is very thin, revealing brass beneath). The stain is so deep, it's impossible to remove it all.

The side knob was chucked into a drill with tape to protect the threads. I sanded the knob and the ferrule (the nickel is very thin, revealing brass beneath). The stain is so deep, it’s impossible to remove it all.

 

All the wood parts were sanded to about 400 or 600 grit and stained with a mahogany / brown mix.

All the wood parts were sanded to about 400 or 600 grit and stained with a mahogany / brown mix.

 

I finished it with a water based poly and paste wax. The same treatment was applied to the handle and the crank knob.

I finished it with a water based poly and paste wax. The same treatment was applied to the handle and the crank knob.

I chucked the ferrule into a drill using some washers and nuts on a through bolt, then polished it out.

I chucked the ferrule into a drill using some washers and nuts on a through bolt, then polished it out.  The brass showed through immediately.

I missed taking some photos of painting the frame and sanding the wood parts (my hands were full).  The chuck was wire-wheeled on the bench grinder.  I’ll take better photos on future restorations.  I painted the parts with Dupli-Color Engine Enamel with ceramic: Gloss Black (DE1613) and Red (DE1653).  I would recommend the Semi-gloss black instead of gloss black for folks doing their own restorations.

Side knob reinstalled and some details of the back of the drill.

Side knob reinstalled and some details of the back of the drill.  Do you see the two oiling holes in the frame?  One is near the chuck and the other is between the lower gear and the side knob.

 

Front of the drill with everything reassembled.

Front of the drill with everything reassembled.

I replaced the inappropriate fastener with an oval-head slotted stainless machine screw. Actually, I thought I’d threaded this one (a #10-32) in, but I later realized it was still too small. I’m going to try and #12 screw before I resort to locating an original screw.

Handle reassembled.

Handle reassembled.  I unknowingly raised a burr on the pin when I tapped it back in, and when I brushed my thumb over the pin to see if it was flush, I sliced the craaap out of it.  Seriously, I almost needed stitches and I ended up gluing my finger back together over and over for about a week.

 

Crank handle, cleaned and waxed.

Crank handle, cleaned and waxed.

CRAFTSMAN / MADE IN USA 107.1

CRAFTSMAN / MADE IN USA 107.1

View of the front of the restored drill.

Front of the restored drill.

 

Rear of restored drill.

Rear of restored drill.

This drill is now ready for another 75 years of service.

Oh, if you want more Craftsman 107.1 hand drill action, check out another restoration over on Bench Blog.  You can read more about the MF 2A at the excellent site Old Tool Heaven.

 

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